Research on Symbolism of Devil (part 4)

This is a visual research for the illustrations used in Dante Alighieri’s (1265–1321) Divine Comedy (Fig. 1 to Fig. 10), particularly in the canticle of Inferno, as well as John Milton’s (1608–1674) Paradise Lost (Fig. 11 to Fig. 16). Alighieri’s cantle mainly describes the scenes in hell by using lots of metaphor or symbolism to represent salvation, justice and sins; As for Milton’s poem is mainly describe the defeat of Satan and the fall of Adam and Eve. And, this is how I was led to Gustave Doré’s (1832–1883) engravings. Doré’s designs of Satan is also in human form with bat-like wings. In comparison with William Blake’s illustrations, his drawings seem more contrast in lighting and realistic. However, I find Blake’s illustrations more interesting because they gives me room of imagination and also creative way of story telling.

Fig. 1. Gustave Doré, illustration from Dante Alighieri’s Inferno, ‘Charon, Ferryman of the Dead’, 1890 (New York: Cassell Publishing Company)

Fig. 2. Gustave Doré, illustration from Dante Alighieri’s Inferno, ‘Dante and Virgil Approaching the Entrance to Hell’, 1890 (New York: Cassell Publishing Company)

Fig. 3. Gustave Doré, illustration from Dante Alighieri’s Inferno, ‘Minos, Judge of the Damned’, 1890 (New York: Cassell Publishing Company)

Fig. 4. Gustave Doré, illustration from Dante Alighieri’s Inferno, ‘Hellish Hurricane That Torments the Lustful’, 1890 (New York: Cassell Publishing Company)

Fig. 5. Gustave Doré, illustration from Dante Alighieri’s Inferno, ‘Punishment of the Avaricious and the Prodigal’, 1890 (New York: Cassell Publishing Company)

Fig. 6. Gustave Doré, illustration from Dante Alighieri’s Inferno, ‘Alichino attacking Ciampolo’, 1890 (New York: Cassell Publishing Company)

Fig. 7. Gustave Doré, illustration from Dante Alighieri’s Inferno, ‘Bertran de Born Displaying His Head’, 1890 (New York: Cassell Publishing Company)

Fig. 8. Gustave Doré, illustration from Dante Alighieri’s Inferno, ‘Harpies in the Wood of the Suicides’, 1890 (New York: Cassell Publishing Company)

Fig. 9. Gustave Doré, illustration from Dante Alighieri’s Inferno, ‘Devils tormenting a barrator from Lucca’, 1890 (New York: Cassell Publishing Company)

Fig. 10. Gustave Doré, illustration from Dante Alighieri’s Inferno, ‘Dante and Virgil before Farinata’, 1890 (New York: Cassell Publishing Company)

Fig. 10. Gustave Doré, illustration from Dante Alighieri’s Inferno, ‘Satan’, 1890 (New York: Cassell Publishing Company)

Fig. 11. Gustave Doré, illustration from Paradise Lost, 1866 (New York: John W. Lovell Company)

Fig. 12. Gustave Doré, illustration from Paradise Lost, 1866 (New York: John W. Lovell Company)

Fig. 13. Gustave Doré, illustration from Paradise Lost, 1866 (New York: John W. Lovell Company)

Fig. 14. Gustave Doré, illustration from Paradise Lost, 1866 (New York: John W. Lovell Company)

Fig. 15. Gustave Doré, illustration from Paradise Lost, 1866 (New York: John W. Lovell Company)

Paradise0013

Fig. 16. Gustave Doré, illustration from Paradise Lost, 1866 (New York: John W. Lovell Company)

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