Line? (Part 4)

To carry on my line experimentations with the grouping perceptions, such as the law of similarity, law of direction and law of common fate (Wertheimer, 1923, p. 301). These grouped lines are utilized for positive space of my practice project. The lines are treated as one-dimensional objects in individual yet in overall the lines are deemed for hatch lines  perception (Arnheim, 1969, p. 219). This round, I tended to sketch out the grouped units in smaller size compared with last time, and observed their group impression (Fig. 1 to Fig. 5). While the numbers of these tiny units are increasing and drawing to each other nearer, the bonds among them are also getting strong by means of the law proximity (Wertheimer, 1923, p. 301).

Michel Eugène Chevreul argues that the perceptual difference is more identified when shared in the complementary color. The juxtaposed complementary would produce “a simple augmentation of their intensity of their respective color.” (Chevreul, 1855, p. 15) In order to impact the ‘movement’ of the group perception, I tend to contrast the color of arrow-liked units from their group by applying complementary colors, i.e., blue and magenta, or green and magenta.

Fig. 1. A stroke experiment with the law of similarity, law of direction and law of common fate, sketched on 23 Dec 2013

Fig. 2. A stroke experiment with the law of similarity, law of direction and law of common fate, sketched on 23 Dec 2013

Fig. 3. A stroke experiment with the law of similarity, law of direction and law of common fate, sketched on 23 Dec 2013

The law of simultaneous colour contrast states that all primary colours appear as the genuine by juxtaposing with grey while black and white perceptually affect a colour’s brightness and toning  (Chevreul, 1855, p. 21). Thus, I applied the grey as the base color of the ground before putting up the blue and magenta colors above it (Fig. 2, Fig. 4 and Fig. 5). Chevreu  (1855, p. 23) suggests that “whenever there is a great difference between the two contiguous colors, the difference is rendered more appreciable by bringing the same color successively in contact with different color belonging to the same group. Magenta elements become more outstanding and reddish when it was placed next to purple element (Fig.4 and Fig. 5).

Besides, I also experience to enrich the image’s depth by increasing the depth levels of figure and ground (Arniem, 1969, p. 236). The blue based-color stripes (Fig. 4) and the grey based-color stripes (Fig. 5) are not only deemed as a group object due to their homogenous similarity, but also a ground to the tiny elements.

pianist_sketch_25_lw

Fig. 4. A stroke experiment with the law of similarity, law of direction and law of common fate, sketched on 23 Dec 2013

Fig. 5. A stroke experiment with the law of similarity, law of direction and law of common fate, sketched on 23 Dec 2013

You might also want to check out part 1, part 2 and part 3 of my line experiments respectively.

References:
Arnheim, Rudolf (1969) Art and Visual Perception: A psychology of the creative eye. Berkeley CA: University of California Press

Chevreul, Michel-Eugene (1855) The Principles of Harmony and Contrast of Colours, and Their Applications to the Arts. London: Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans

Wertheimer, Max (1923) ‘Laws of Organization in Perceptual Forms’, Untersuchungen zur Lehre von der Gestalt 2 (4), 301-350,http://psychclassics.yorku.ca/Wertheimer/Forms/forms.htm (visited 15/10/13)

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s