Line? (Part 3)

Some of the visual research mainly obtained from Behance, my favorite online gallery since 2011. It’s surprise and exciting to see how other artist articulating their ideas with line and dot expressions.

1. Ildikó Valicsek
Link: http://www.behance.net/ildivalicsek
A series of fascinating line-weaving textures done by Ildikó Valicsek, whose works was shared by my tutor Barbara Brownies earlier, immediately caught my attention. Valicsek is currently a student studying textile design. She has created several series of beautiful textures, in conjunction with lines and shapes in various materials (Fig. 1 to Fig.5). That’s also a video I found online in which she shared her idea of creating texture in TEDXYouth, it’s a pity that I couldn’t understand the language without the translation. The line textures created generally shows a directional movement. Lots of the units could be perceived as part of whole organization through the law of similarity and law of direction (Wertheimer, 1923, p. 301).

Fig. 1. Ildikó Valicsek, Line, 2013. http://www.behance.net/ildivalicsek

Fig. 2. Ildikó Valicsek, Line, 2013. http://www.behance.net/ildivalicsek

79a4512e4dd529bb988ae08f01c0acf52

Fig. 3. Ildikó Valicsek, Line, 2013. http://www.behance.net/ildivalicsek

Fig. 4. Ildikó Valicsek, Line, 2013. http://www.behance.net/ildivalicsek

Fig. 4. Ildikó Valicsek, Line, 2013. http://www.behance.net/ildivalicsek

Fig. 5. Ildikó Valicsek, Leaf, 2013. http://www.behance.net/ildivalicsek

2. Sun Cho
Link: http://www.behance.net/suncho
The positive space of the images is formed by thousands of condensed stroked toning while the negative space is kept uninked (Fig.6 to Fig. 9). The flow the texture, served similarly likes visual pathway, shows a movement to lead the audience’s attention.

Fig. 6. Sun Cho, Thousands of Strokes, 2013. http://www.behance.net/suncho

Fig. 7. Sun Cho, Thousands of Strokes, 2013. http://www.behance.net/suncho

Fig. 8. Sun Cho, Thousands of Strokes, 2013. http://www.behance.net/suncho

Fig. 9. Sun Cho, Thousands of Strokes, 2013. http://www.behance.net/suncho

3. Tetiana Kartasheva
Link: http://www.behance.net/TatyanaKartasheva
The tones found in the illustration, all are painted in tile-liked shading (Fig10 to Fig. 14). Tetiana Kartasheva’s artworks does remind me of Georges Seurat’s A Sunday on La Grande Jatte, whose innovative painting style known as pointillism.

Fig. 10. Tetiana Kartasheva, Mosaic Watercor, 2011. http://www.behance.net/TatyanaKartasheva

Fig. 11. Tetiana Kartasheva, Mosaic Watercor, 2011. http://www.behance.net/TatyanaKartasheva

Fig. 12. Tetiana Kartasheva, Mosaic Watercor, 2011. http://www.behance.net/TatyanaKartasheva

Fig. 13. Tetiana Kartasheva, Mosaic Watercor, 2011. http://www.behance.net/TatyanaKartasheva

Fig. 14. Tetiana Kartasheva, Mosaic Watercor, 2011. http://www.behance.net/TatyanaKartasheva

4. Vance Kirkland (1963–1981)
Link: www.kirklandmuseum.org
Except of researching for the artists who utilize strokes, I also look for inspirations in using dots. Vance Kirkland’s mastery of dots soon caught my eyes. Kirkland referred his painting style as ‘Designed Realism’, in which he painted the objects in the designed rhythms, mostly with dots, lines and shapes.

Fig. 15. Vance Kirkland, Orange and Yellow Suns in Grey Space, 1971. http://www.kirklandmuseum.org

Fig. 16. Vance Kirkland, Explosion on a Sun 70 Billion Light Years, 1979. http://www.kirklandmuseum.org

Fig. 17. Vance Kirkland, Painting No. 17, 1964. http://www.kirklandmuseum.org

Fig. 18. Vance Kirkland, Forces of Energy from a Sun in the Great Star Cloud K-2, 1971. http://www.kirklandmuseum.org

Welcome to check out part 1, part 2 and part 4 of my line experiments.

Reference:
Wertheimer, Max (1923) Laws of Organization in Perceptual Forms. Untersuchungen zur Lehre von der Gestalt 2 (4), 301-350, available at https://artstrokez.wordpress.com/2013/10/18/max-wertheimer-laws-of-organization-in-perceptual-form-part-1/ (visited 15/10/13)

Advertisements

2 responses to “Line? (Part 3)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s